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Samples of My Work for the MN Degree in Clinical Nursing

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Statements of Excellence for the Master's Degree in Nursing, MN

As expected, the World Health Organization has reported that people are living longer in developed countries that offer a good quality of life, such as San Mareno (73.4 years), Italy (72.7 years), and Spain (72.6 years.) Conversely, life expectancy is lowest in impoverished, developing nations. Those with the lowest life expectancy are Sierra Leone (28.6 years), Zimbabwe (33.6 years), and Zambia (34.9 years).

One issue affecting elders internationally includes migration of older adults from their nations of origin, such as from the Western Pacific to the United States, which increases the social burden on developing nations. Older adults may migrate to new countries to care for grandchildren.

In some countries, families that used to stay home to care for aging adults no longer do so. For instance, in Japan, the wife of the oldest son used to care for her husband's mother. Today, women in Japan are in the workforce and no longer at home.

All of the Statement samples on this web site were written more than 2 years ago and all are anonymous.

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The Humanitarian Side of MN Advanced Clinical

Are you thinking of studying a master´s of nursing advanced clinical practice major? If so, you could be in for a treat! There are many ways you can use this specialty to do good globally. Let´s explore some of the ways nurses like you have reached out and made a difference.

Sheila Wilson’s work has literally taken her all over the map. She has volunteered with international organizations on four continents and practiced in refugee camps, war zones – even on an oil rig.

This Scottish-born nurse went to Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, 36 years ago as a midwife. She heard a talk by a nurse who had recently come back from working with the International Grenfell Association in Labrador and it inspired her to work throughout the area in diverse roles.

She says that almost no one realizes how many different types of nursing there are out there to plug into. As an RN, she´s been amazed by the possibilies. One of the biggest challenges she´s been involved in was setting up the world’s largest refugee camp as head of the International Red Cross emergency response to the influx of 250,000 Rwandans into neighboring Tanzania in 1994. For several years before that, she found herself on the front lines of other emergency disaster relief efforts in east African countries including Ethiopia, Sudan and Somalia. More recently, she was involved in providing aid to North Koreans during a severe famine.Nurse Wilson’s work for humanitarian organizations has won her numerous awards and earned her invitations to speak to various groups, including young nurses considering similar work abroad.

She often says that it’s the humanitarian values that draw you in, but the people keep you coming back. They show such gratitude for your work, she adds. However, Wilson tries to paint as realistic a picture as possible of conflict situations. “If you’re not scared, then something’s wrong,” she says. You have to learn the basics about the culture and customs of the region where you’re going, she advises.

Aiofe Ni Mhurchu has Dedicated her Life To Humanitarian Service

This nurse´s life choices were greatly influenced by her uncle, who was a Society of African Missions priest. He worked in Africa for 40 years. As a child, her ears, mind and my heart were filled with stories of Africa. Her uncle instilled that love in her, and inspired her to get involved in humanitarian work.

Aiofe did a nursing diploma at University College Cork, a degree at Waterford Institute of Technology and a diploma in tropical nursing at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Then she started working with Operation Smile, an NGO whose work focusses on facial reconstructive surgery in developing countries in Africa and the Philippines. She was in the Philippines when Typhoon Hagupit struck the country in December, 2014. She was asked to join an emergency team and worked with the Philippine army doing medical evacuation. Her experience made her decide that was what she wanted to do with her life.

She came to Papua New Guinea with Doctors without Border in the summer of 2015. She worked at a hospital in the Tari highlands: a very remote, inaccessible part of the country. The focus of her work there was on family and sexual violence and emergency surgery. She was the nursing activity manager, providing support for staff in all aspects of patient care. They had a team of six expatriate staff, and Aiofe was the only nurse. They had one surgeon, an anesthetist, a project co-ordinator and a logistician. They also use 111, national, Doctors without Borders-trained staff. The work there is very difficult, says Aiofe. A lot of women were trapped in a cycle of violence, and the team saw them come back again and again. Papua New Guinea is one of the worst places in the world for gender-based violence, with the highest incidence outside an active conflict zone. There is a lot of family and intimate-partner violence.

Daily life in the highlands can be extremely violent, but the atmosphere within the hospital compound is lively and friendly, says Aiofe. The local people are very welcoming, and would protect her team at all costs. She feels safe there, but her life is confined to the hospital compound. She is not permitted to move around very much, so her work and her life are intertwined, and since she loves her work, she is very happy. These nurses both love their work, and are committed to it. Whether you choose to dedicate your life to humanitarian work, or choose to interlace it with work back home, your contribution will make a difference. It may also provide you with such a sense of meaning and purpose, that you no longer want to do anything else. We support nurses choosing to improve their lives through study and the lives of others through their work. Please let us know if our personal statement writing services could provide you with a helping hand during your journey.